Four Rivers Cultural Center received a grant for their Tradition Keepers Folklore program in July, which attracted 800 people, 100 more than the event’s first year in 2018. (The Enterprise/File)

VALE - The Malheur County Cultural Trust, which provides grants to help local organizations bring a vibrant cultural life to the area, recently received new state funding for 2020. 

This year, the Oregon Cultural Trust allocated $10,372 for cultural programs at schools, community centers, historic buildings, museums, theaters, libraries, tourism and art galleries in Malheur County, the Malheur County Cultural Trust said in a press release.

In total, the release said, the Malheur County Cultural Trust has awarded $125,109 in recent years.

The deadline to apply for a grant is Saturday, Feb. 22, and information on the process is on the website at malheurculturaltrust.org.

Last year, grants went to local organizations for a range of projects and activities, and to help plan, organize and advertise cultural events, according to Charlotte Fugate, secretary and treasurer for the Malheur County Cultural Trust.

The Drexel H. Foundation, a nonprofit based in Vale, received a $900 grant to help young students learn the skills of filmmaking, Fugate said.

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Fugate said that Four Rivers Cultural Center received a grant for their Tradition Keepers Folklore program in July, which attracted 800 people, 100 more than the event’s first year in 2018.

This year, the event will be on Saturday, June 20, at the Four Rivers Cultural center.

Additionally, Treasure Valley Community College received $1,000 to cover marketing and advertising for its annual Equity Week program, Fugate said. Equity Week took place last spring at the college and consisted of a week of conversations about identity, diversity, and inclusion, and featured speakers from the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project and regional activists.

Cathy Yasuda, the college’s chief development officer, said the grant was used to help market and promote the program.

The event was promoted on the college campus, but also to the community to develop a more diverse audience.

“We are very grateful to the Malheur County Cultural Trust for their support of Equity Week,” Yasuda said. “We are really grateful for those funds.” 

This year’s Equity Week has already been scheduled for Monday, April 20, through Friday, April 24, Yasuda said, and will focus on the needs of the homeless as well as food insecurity in the community.

Yasuda said that the goal would be to get more of the college’s faculty and student body to volunteer for service projects at places like the Origins Faith Community meal site and day shelter in Ontario.

Yasuda said she is working closely with pastors Tammy and James Vogt of Origins Faith Community on coordinating service projects for that week.

News tip? Contact reporter Joe Siess: [email protected] or 541-473-3377.

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